We live in an ever-growing digital culture that requires us to remain “plugged in” at all hours of the day and night. There is no denying our prevailing attachment to our cell phones, our incessant need to check our social media pages, and our relentless desire to stay tuned in to the popular culture trends of our society. While these patterns of American culture are neither good nor bad, it is most certainly necessary to take a critical look into how these tendencies are influencing the youth of today. It’s not a difficult task to look around and see individuals of all ages buried in their cell phones or spending time in front of a computer screen. Although these patterns have progressively intensified over the past decade as we dive more deeply into a technological society, our human need to step away from distractions and turn to nature is not new. 

In the early 1900s, a pioneer and trailblazing woman named Elizabeth Ford Holt observed the rapidly developing American industrial society and decided that she needed to create a place for boys to go to escape the claustrophobic urban hubs and spend time learning the lessons of nature.

Mrs. Elizabeth Ford Holt, founder of Camp Mowglis in 1903 and advocate for outdoor learning

Mrs. Elizabeth Ford Holt, founder of Camp Mowglis in 1903 and advocate of outdoor learning

Fast-forward 112 years and Camp Mowglis of Hebron, NH still places the same values on outdoor and experiential learning. As a “School of the Open,” Camp Mowglis fosters a sense of environmental responsibility, respect for our natural world, and an appreciation of simplified “unplugged” living. The benefits of youth putting aside technological attachments have been proven over and over again. At Camp Mowglis, we could not support this idea more. 

Boys set aside their cell phones, iPads, and computers for 7 weeks and instead turn to the unique activities offered at Camp Mowglis such as archery, woodworking or riflery.

Archery instructor teaches camper how to repair arrows

Archery instructor teaches camper how to repair arrows

 

Campers learn how to make toolboxes in the new Wood Shop

Campers learn how to make toolboxes in the new wood shop

 

Riflery instructors teach campers proper shooting form at the range

Riflery instructors teach campers proper shooting form at the range

Instead of turning on the television, boys find ways to entertain themselves by initiating a game of cards, basketball knock-out, or tetherball.

Campers initiate a ball game while waiting down at the waterfront

Campers initiate a ball game while waiting down at the waterfront

Rather than sitting inside at night playing a video game, boys are upholding the decades-long tradition of sitting around a crackling campfire under the pines of New Hampshire listening to a staff member read Rudyard Kipling’s Jungle Book or talk about a passion. 

Senior Staff Mr. James Hart shares his passion for Motorcycles during campfire

Senior Staff Mr. James Hart shares his passion for Motorcycles during campfire

To top it all off, turning off the technology and focusing on the simpler Camp Mowglis lifestyle is hard to resist when you have refreshing Newfound Lake waiting for you to enjoy every day. 

Campers and staff members enjoy evening soak on Newfound Lake

Campers and staff members enjoy evening soak on Newfound Lake

 

Photo taken of Newfound Lake by camper during photography industry

Photo taken of Newfound Lake by camper during photography industry

We are very luck at Camp Mowglis to have the opportunity to embrace traditional, authentic, “unplugged” fun.

Happy Camping, and as we say at Mowglis: Good Hunting!

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